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Posted by raherschbach on 15 Nov 2017

It's a field where employer demand is high and opportunities are burgeoning, industry representatives say. Private businesses and the public sector both have a pressing need for individuals with analytics expertise.

“As everybody knows, there’s a huge shortage of analytical talent out there and some estimates are that millions of students will be needed," said SAS analytical consultant Andre’ de Waal during a visit to Capitol on Friday (November 3).

De Waal and other representatives of SAS, an industry leader in analytics software and services, gave presentations to Capitol students and also met with the faculty to offer input into new analytics programs that are being offered at Capitol starting in Fall 2018.

A master's program in cyber analytics will educate professionals in harnessing the power of data to stop malicious hackers and cybercriminals in their tracks. Also at the graduate level, Capitol is unveiling a technical MBA in business analytics.

Meanwhile, undergraduate students at Capitol can now major in business analytics and become experts in data-driven decision-making, an increasingly pivotal skill set in today's business environment.

Qualified professionals in the field are in short supply and companies ranging from industry giants to emerging startups areo technology pioneers are looking for students with these specializations, De Waal explained. SAS, he said, sees a mutually beneficial relationship in assisting unversities like Capitol with developing analytics programs.

Andre de Waal, analytics consultant, SAS“We have the technology and the tools. So we’d like to make our tools and technology available to universities so that you can be exposed to the tools and analytics, so that when [students] get to the workforce they are ready to succeed without the companies having to go for further training," De Waal said.

Preparing students for the workforce through hands-on training and collaborative learning has long been a cornerstone of Capitol Technology University’s approach to technology education. Capitol was also one of the first institutions of higher education to offer an academic degree program in cybersecurity, making the university a natural fit for the emerging cyber analytics field.

In 2010, it launched the nation's first cybersecurity doctoral program. Capitol’s program is a DHS and NSA-designated Center of Excellence in cybersecurity education.

With the volume and sophistication of cyber attacks on the increase, many see analytics as a way to keep ahead of potential adversaries. “It opens up the possibility of predicting malicious behavior before it happens,” Sarah Alspaw, Director of Career Development and Student Success, said. “As many companies and organizations have learned, pre-empting an attack is far less costly than cleaning up after one."

To learn more about our upcoming programs in business and cyber analytics, contact the admissions department at admissions@captechu.edu or phone 800-950-1992

Blog

Posted by raherschbach on 10 Nov 2017

To all my brothers and sisters in Arms: First, thank you for your service. I am writing today on behalf of Capitol Technology University to celebrate that service and recognize your many sacrifices.

All of us: active duty, reservist, and retired have given so much to our country. We have sacrificed our time, and have missed moments in our family’s lives that should have been life-long memories. We have trained in the rain and the dirt, and have spent hours strategically planning how we will safeguard our country. We have lost our lives, the lives of our children, yet in the mist of our pain and suffering we drove on until our mission was complete. The battle is not over and we still pray every day for the safety of our military family.

Each Veterans Day we are reminded that we have served with some of the most brilliant leaders and followers in the world. Our memories good and bad will never fade. We have stood next to a person one day and then mourned their death the next. The selfless service from us all is bittersweet. We don’t do it for the money, prestige or attention. Everything we do is from the heart; we are passionate about our duties and responsibilities to this nation.

Today, however, I ask each of you to pause and take a moment of silence and reflect on what Veterans Day means to you and to your military family. This is an awesome opportunity to share our experiences, cry, laugh and reflect. We want to focus on the good, but never forget that painful moments are a part of learning and growth. We must continue to live and make every moment count.

In closing, I ask you to join our nation today in celebrating the long line of warriors who have served honorably and faithfully. I ask you to extend a hand to our brothers and sisters in arms, both young and old. I also ask you to answer the nation’s call again – this as a survivor, a witness, and a teacher of all that represents the highest in military honor and distinction.

 

 

 
  

                                                                                   

 

 

Blog

Posted by Anonymous (not verified) on 8 Nov 2017

Rock-Sat Satellite Launch Fascinated by space and satellites? Aspire to a career in the field? The first step, of course, is to gain an education with the right credentials – such as an astronautical engineering degree from Capitol Technology University. But what about the next step? What needs to be done in order to get your career off the launch pad?

We asked Dr. Alex “Sandy” Antunes, associate professor of astronautical engineering at Capitol. He’s mentored dozens of students and seen their careers progress, starting from entry level flight ops positions to higher-level roles in administration. While no one formula works the same way for everyone, Antunes says, most astronautical engineering career paths involve the following steps.

  • Obtain hands-on experience. Understanding theory is good. Being able to apply it is even better. Capitol provides abundant real-time experience to students in the form of projects such as the CACTUS-1 CubeSat mission. That practical experience adds up to greater hireability, Antunes says. “Employers know they won’t have to spend three to six months getting their new employee up to speed.”
  • Build your network. Many, if not most, career opportunities in the field come about as a result of contacts and connections.  At Capitol, astronautical engineering students benefit from the university’s close connections with NASA and private contractors. “We have built a really strong network in this field” Antunes says. “As a result, we have students who are placed in internships that are not announced to the general public. We have people on our advisory board who visit campus regularly to tell us about job openings. Many of our faculty come from NASA-Goddard or from local contractors, and they can help students identify the best avenues for their careers.”
  • Take advantage of internships. “These allow you to ‘try before you buy’ and get a clear idea of what a specific type of job entails on a day to day basis,” notes Antunes. “Without internship experience it can be hard to know exactly what the best fit is for you.” Internships also enable students to make contacts within organizations and build their networks (see “Networking is essential,” above).

As a “fresh-out” (newly graduated student), you’ll most likely be working in flight ops or hardware integration, and your employer will probably be a contractor rather than the federal government, Antunes says. “We highly recommend that graduates go for these entry-level jobs. It gets them in the door, into a team environment, doing hands-on space stuff. Eighty percent of jobs at NASA-Goddard are with contractors; federal employees typically manage and administrate. Starting with a contractor also has the advantage of extending your reach, because they work with multiple entities – not only NASA, but the DoD and other federal agencies.

And what if you go into astronautical engineering only to discover that you’re really not all that crazy about space? “The great thing about the degree is that you’re also an electrical engineer (EE) and a systems engineer,” Antunes says. “So even if satellites aren’t your thing, it’s not that hard to make a switch.  One way or another, there’s a market out there for your skills and knowledge.”

RockSat-X Launch Photo Courtesy of Marissa Jagarnath

 

Blog

Posted by svanhorn on 7 Nov 2017

On Halloween night at Capitol, the university library had become a haunted house. Phantoms and monsters of every description lurked among the creatively decorated stacks.

“It brought out all of the students who really appreciate Halloween,” explains Brandi McKee, director of Student Life and Residential Services. “The creative use of going to the dollar store and getting spider webs and streamers, and blacking out windows to create the maze and to have people strategically in different places… the creativity was the coolest part of it. They really utilized resources phenomenally.”

For McKee, the event was an ideal example of the student community coming together to do something fun for their fellow students – a philosophy encouraged at the university.  S-Lab (the student run, student leadership board) had several meetings to put the event together, working with non-S-Lab student community members to make the event a success.

“Student life is student driven.” You’ll hear that motto often at Capitol. But what does that mean for students who want to start a club, who want to participate in on-campus activities, or who just want to be able to meet other students?

According McKee, it means that any student can come to her with an idea and she can help to make it a reality. “The students generate the ideas. They generate the ‘This is what I want’ ‘This is how I want to do it.’ And we’re here to provide the resources, and that’s not just money.” McKee helps to pull Capitol’s resources towards various student projects and desires. She connects students to each other, the Resident Assistants on campus, and S-Lab to help make what they want possible.

Ideas can be as simple as wanting more people to eat with at your favorite restaurant. One student said to McKee, “I wish I had more people to go and eat with, I really like Buffalo Wild Wings.” McKee involved the RA’s, who organized groups of people to start going on Thursday nights.

 Another student reached out to McKee because she had family in Puerto Rico and wanted to do something to help. From there, McKee helped to foster the student’s ideas to create a charity drive for Puerto Rico. The student reached out to outside resources planning similar projects and rallied the support of her fellow students to make the drive possible.

The student behind the drive has also inspired a community blood drive for Puerto Rico, coming up Wednesday (November 8). The charitable drive itself will focus on medical supplies, with more information to follow from Student Life.

“The students have to have that investment into it,” said McKee. “What do you want to do? Okay. And then the student life piece of it is how do we get you there?”

Blog

Posted by raherschbach on 7 Nov 2017

The Capitol community recently welcomed SAS representatives to our campus for a special event on Friday (November 3). SAS, an industry leader in analytics software and services, came out to discuss the rising demand for analytical talent in technology and business.

Students who attended the event were able to gain a better understanding of the current lack of people resources available to companies regarding analytical needs, what analytical business and cyber analytics programs might involve, and the demand for these skilled workers in both government and industry positions.

Andre de Waal, analytics consultant, SASQualified professionals in the field are in short supply, said SAS analytical consultant Andre’ de Waal. “As everybody knows, there’s a huge shortage of analytical talent out there and some estimates are that millions of students will be needed.” 

Many companies, from traditional businesses to technology pioneers are looking for students with these specializations, he added.

SAS sees a mutually beneficial relationship in assisting universities like Capitol with developing programs in analytics, De Waal noted. “We have the technology and the tools. So we’d like to make our tools and technology available to universities so that you can be exposed to the tools and analytics, so that when [students] get to the workforce they are ready to succeed without the companies having to go for further training.”

Preparing students for the workforce through hands-on training and collaborative learning has long been a cornerstone of Capitol Technology University’s approach to technology education. Starting in Fall 2018, the university is launching a master’s degree program in cyber analytics and an undergraduate degree program in business analytics.

Starting a cyber analytics program is a natural fit for Capitol in many ways. Given the university’s longstanding engagement with cybersecurity, we are in a unique position to prepare our students to become the pioneers of the field. Capitol was one of the first institutions of higher education to offer an academic degree program in cybersecurity. In 2010, it started the nation’s first doctoral degree program in the field. Capitol’s cybersecurity program is a DHS and NSA-designated Center of Excellence in cybersecurity education.

With the volume and sophistication of cyber attacks on the increase, many see analytics as a way to keep ahead of potential adversaries. “It opens up the possibility of predicting malicious behavior before it happens,” Sarah Alspaw, Director of Career Development and Student Success, said. “As many companies and organizations have learned, pre-empting an attack is far less costly than cleaning up after one."

To learn more about our upcoming programs in business and cyber analytics, contact the admissions department at admissions@captechu.edu or phone 800-950-1992


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